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Four books that taught us it’s okay to not fit in

Camillia Dass
Camillia Dass

Published: 5 May 2016, 3:09 PM

Have you ever wanted to give your younger self a few tips on life? Here are a few books I wished I had read back then.

No matter your popularity in school, I’m sure that you struggled with feelings of inadequacy or loneliness at some point. I know I certainly did.

Sometimes, the books I read remind me of those painfully awkward days.

Here’s a list of four emotionally rewarding books that taught us it’s okay to not fit in.

1. Fish In A Tree by Lynda Hunt

Fish in a Tree is a book based on a 12-year-old girl who manages to cleverly create disruptions in the classroom. She does this to avoid letting anyone know that she cannot read as she is dyslexic.

THIS BOOK IS GREAT FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES. PHOTO CREDIT: LYNDAMULLALYHUNT.COM

This book follows Ally as she meets a wonderful teacher who slowly begins to help her learn to read and to come to terms with her dyslexia. I’d recommend Fish in a Tree for anyone who has ever gone through bullying, feeling stupid, useless and like you aren’t important. So basically… everyone.

Honestly, this book should be mandatory reading material in schools.

2. Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor and Park follows two teenagers who both stand out in their own different ways. Eleanor has frizzy hair and is a bit chubby. Park is the only Asian kid in his school. Both of them constantly get mocked for their differences.

When Park reaches out and lets Eleanor sit next to him on the bus, sparks start to fly and the two slowly fall in love with each other over a mutual love for comic books and music.

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WARNING: THIS BOOK MIGHT LEAVE YOU IN TEARS.

This book is amazing for anyone who has ever felt like they don’t belong because both the main characters are completely out of the mould. They will make you like feel like someone understands your struggles, especially if you have a tough time in school.

3. Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Fangirl is a book about Cath, a big Simon Snow fan. She is so obsessed with him that she writes Simon Snow fan fiction, and her stories are pretty well known in the fandom.

When Cath finally starts going to college, she has to deal with loads of new things, while trying to stay true to herself and her love for writing and reading.

 

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RAINBOW ROWELL IS FAMOUS FOR CREATING RELATABLE CHARACTERS.

This book is great for anyone who has felt like their hobbies or their passions tend to be something that is not necessarily considered popular. I feel like every introvert can relate to Cath, because she really is the epitome of teenage struggles.

4. Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

In Finding Audrey, we follow a girl called Audrey who has a severe form of social anxiety.

Her anxiety is so bad that she struggles to leave the house or meet new people. One day, she is introduced to a boy who seems to be able to coax her out of her shell, helping her discover more about herself.

 

THIS BOOK IS GREAT FOR ANYONE WHO HAS STRUGGLED WITH FEELING INVISIBLE. PHOTO CREDIT: SOPHIEKINSELLA.CO.UK

While working on this list, I sometimes wish my younger self had read these books. We all could do with a reminder that our differences should not make us feel unimportant or overlooked.


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